Author: Wayne Meyers
Website: https://waynemeyers.com/
Genre: Space Opera and Fantasy

Review: Birth of a Star, Prequel

A glimpse into humanity’s progenitor race.

Seen through the eyes of Aldrea, a young, precocious teen, Birth of a Star tells the story of a small group of telepathic Observers out on routine assignment to collect data on worlds seeded eons ago by the vast Quenterian civilization. When Aldrea’s father is pulled into a conflict with a member of the rogue Radical faction over the discovery of a rare object on a seedling world, Aldrea jumps into a daring rescue attempt and lands herself in the middle of a dangerous situation.

This finely-crafted prequel gives a fantastic introduction to the talented Quenterians and their values. It also ends with the birth of a sentient star which is REALLY COOL!

I highly recommend reading this story before launching into Visitor. Armed with knowledge of Aldrea and her people, the events of Visitor roll out smoothly and make perfect sense. Clean writing and colorful worldbuilding make this an excellent read.

Review: Visitor

Wow, I really loved this one!

When a small pod descends from orbit and disappears in the mountains of upstate New York, it sets into motion a whole series of events: Douglas Keller, on vacation in the Adirondacks, encounters a beautiful young woman who heals him from a near-fatal fall; FBI Deputy Director Bill Hoffman reluctantly agrees to work with obnoxious CIA Director Edward Swann in a massive hunt to locate the mysterious pod and its occupant. The moment the agents close in on Doug and Aldrea, a militant off-world force appears and captures the couple and the agents, whisking them across the galaxy where they find themselves in the middle of a hostile takeover of the vast Quenterian network of worlds, the civilization that seeded Earth. Off to a good start, right?

The story is totally engaging, well-paced, and told from multiple points of view, painting a rich tapestry of down-to-earth, oddly likable characters, including the government agents (which took me by surprise). I found myself smiling often at the quirky, well-done dialog as well as the beautifully described telepathic bond that develops between Doug and Aldrea. Gold star, Wayne.

Two thumbs up to the concepts laced within the book: humanity as a seedling culture left in isolation by a more advanced race, the conflicting opinions within that race about humanity’s value, and the potential for humans, even CIA agents, to adapt and lift themselves to new heights beyond technology. I am also quite in step with the author’s portrayal of stars as sentient beings and the concept that older races exist who wish to help younger races through difficulties in their development. Spot on. We definitely need that kind of help.

The story has a satisfying ending, and, even though there is no indication that the author intends to continue with a sequel, I would certainly love to see more of these characters and the Quenterian worlds. This is an author to enjoy and watch.

Review: Sonnet of the New Dawn, short story

A wistful touch of dystopia.

Well written and quite worth the read, this short story gives us a sad and disturbing reflection of our society’s obsession with smart phones, security, and video cams.

In Jim Cork’s world, privacy is a thing of the past. People are watched and scanned every moment, even in their own homes, analyzed for aberrant behavior to stamp out anything “bad” before it can infect society. The cost of perceived safety is humanity’s freedom and imagination, and Jim lives a stifled life devoid of color. When a seemingly crazy old man slips him a key with an address and cryptic note, Jim must face his fears and decide whether to respond to the allure of a private, unseen world.

I share the author’s concern that our society may be heading (in my opinion, steered) toward a surreal, ugly, and shallow future unless we take care of our innate talents that make us strong. Like other dystopian works, this story urges us to make better choices.

Erin MacMichael is a visionary science fiction author and artist, creator of the T'nari Renegades series of novellas, novels, covers, and artwork. Her lifelong quest has been to explore past the boundaries of conventional thinking and figure out what really has transpired on this planet. She has traveled extensively throughout the world and lives in the Pacific Northwest with her marvelous offspring.

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Author: Wayne Meyers
Website: https://waynemeyers.com/
Genre: Space Opera and Fantasy

Review: Birth of a Star, Prequel

A glimpse into humanity’s progenitor race.

Seen through the eyes of Aldrea, a young, precocious teen, Birth of a Star tells the story of a small group of telepathic Observers out on routine assignment to collect data on worlds seeded eons ago by the vast Quenterian civilization. When Aldrea’s father is pulled into a conflict with a member of the rogue Radical faction over the discovery of a rare object on a seedling world, Aldrea jumps into a daring rescue attempt and lands herself in the middle of a dangerous situation.

This finely-crafted prequel gives a fantastic introduction to the talented Quenterians and their values. It also ends with the birth of a sentient star which is REALLY COOL!

I highly recommend reading this story before launching into Visitor. Armed with knowledge of Aldrea and her people, the events of Visitor roll out smoothly and make perfect sense. Clean writing and colorful worldbuilding make this an excellent read.

Review: Visitor

Wow, I really loved this one!

When a small pod descends from orbit and disappears in the mountains of upstate New York, it sets into motion a whole series of events: Douglas Keller, on vacation in the Adirondacks, encounters a beautiful young woman who heals him from a near-fatal fall; FBI Deputy Director Bill Hoffman reluctantly agrees to work with obnoxious CIA Director Edward Swann in a massive hunt to locate the mysterious pod and its occupant. The moment the agents close in on Doug and Aldrea, a militant off-world force appears and captures the couple and the agents, whisking them across the galaxy where they find themselves in the middle of a hostile takeover of the vast Quenterian network of worlds, the civilization that seeded Earth. Off to a good start, right?

The story is totally engaging, well-paced, and told from multiple points of view, painting a rich tapestry of down-to-earth, oddly likable characters, including the government agents (which took me by surprise). I found myself smiling often at the quirky, well-done dialog as well as the beautifully described telepathic bond that develops between Doug and Aldrea. Gold star, Wayne.

Two thumbs up to the concepts laced within the book: humanity as a seedling culture left in isolation by a more advanced race, the conflicting opinions within that race about humanity’s value, and the potential for humans, even CIA agents, to adapt and lift themselves to new heights beyond technology. I am also quite in step with the author’s portrayal of stars as sentient beings and the concept that older races exist who wish to help younger races through difficulties in their development. Spot on. We definitely need that kind of help.

The story has a satisfying ending, and, even though there is no indication that the author intends to continue with a sequel, I would certainly love to see more of these characters and the Quenterian worlds. This is an author to enjoy and watch.

Review: Sonnet of the New Dawn, short story

A wistful touch of dystopia.

Well written and quite worth the read, this short story gives us a sad and disturbing reflection of our society’s obsession with smart phones, security, and video cams.

In Jim Cork’s world, privacy is a thing of the past. People are watched and scanned every moment, even in their own homes, analyzed for aberrant behavior to stamp out anything “bad” before it can infect society. The cost of perceived safety is humanity’s freedom and imagination, and Jim lives a stifled life devoid of color. When a seemingly crazy old man slips him a key with an address and cryptic note, Jim must face his fears and decide whether to respond to the allure of a private, unseen world.

I share the author’s concern that our society may be heading (in my opinion, steered) toward a surreal, ugly, and shallow future unless we take care of our innate talents that make us strong. Like other dystopian works, this story urges us to make better choices.


Erin MacMichael is a visionary science fiction author and artist, creator of the T'nari Renegades series of novellas, novels, covers, and artwork. Her lifelong quest has been to explore past the boundaries of conventional thinking and figure out what really has transpired on this planet. She has traveled extensively throughout the world and lives in the Pacific Northwest with her marvelous offspring.

Erin MacMichael is a visionary science fiction author and artist, creator of the T'nari Renegades series of novellas, novels, covers, and artwork. Her lifelong quest has been to explore past the boundaries of conventional thinking and figure out what really has transpired on this planet. She has traveled extensively throughout the world and lives in the Pacific Northwest with her marvelous offspring.

 

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *