Author: Rick A. Allen
Website: https://rickaallensf.com/
Genre: First Contact Science Fiction

Review: The Worth of a World, Prequel

Unique races, thoughtful storyline.

As a reader, I always start with the prequel(s) of a series to pull every ounce of depth out of an author’s universe. Rick Allen’s The Worth of a World is a wonderful springboard into the Nodal Community of worlds that provides the arena for the Star Rider series.

The enigmatic entities who create one-way, interstellar bridges between a network of planets in the galaxy are mentioned briefly, but not explored in detail. Instead, the action of the story revolves around a group of delegates, all non-human, from the Trio of Worlds, Emdann, Shren, and Achaylah, who have been sent to Wingt-xem, a planet that has just discovered its link within the Star Rider network. The emissaries’ task is to evaluate the Wingts’ use of advanced technology shared by the Trio of Worlds and determine the merit of the newcomers’ application to join the community. As startling events unfold, the delegates uncover deceit and disturbing truths about the dominant Wingt government and find themselves caught in the crossfire between warring factions.

While it is not absolutely necessary to read The Worth of a World before launching into Book I, I wholeheartedly recommend reading it first as it provides clear understanding of the challenges faced by the Nodal Community in sharing technology among its members. The tragedy that takes place on Wingt-xem is still deeply felt within the drama of Book I.

Review: Star Riders, Book I

The Star Riders are awesome!

The first book of what promises to be an intriguing series is told from the perspective of an astrophysicist of Earth’s first colony who discovers the bizarre Star Rider discs while searching for his missing brother. Bacary and his team are transported to another star system and inexplicably find themselves at the center of a violent conflict within the Nodal Community of worlds linked by the Star Riders.

The writing is clean and flows easily, the mark of natural talent and good editing. The intelligent races depicted are enormously original and refreshing, ranging from the reclusive meerkat-like Emdannens and contentious panther-like Throngans to the white hair-covered of-Shren and humanoid Wingts. The Star Riders are quite mysterious, with the inexplicable ability to generate energy-harvesting discs around stars and manipulate physicality at will. The unseen entities hold themselves apart from those who ride with them to the next star system, dematerializing anything inorganic in the interstellar jumps, thus allowing the “lesser” races to work out for themselves how they will deal with disparities in technological advancement. It is an interesting premise and provides an insightful look at races lacking a high moral code or unified governments who go to violent extremes to further their self-centered goals. Hmm, sounds familiar, doesn’t it?

I really enjoyed Bacary’s journey to find his brother and came to admire the depth of his love and loyalty. I’m looking forward to the upcoming Book II of the series and hope to learn more about the race of Star Riders.

Erin MacMichael is a science fantasy author and artist, creator of the T'nari Renegades series of novellas, novels, covers, and artwork. Her lifelong quest has been to explore past the boundaries of conventional thinking and figure out what really has transpired on this planet. She has traveled extensively throughout the world and lives in the Pacific Northwest with her marvelous offspring.

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Author: Rick A. Allen
Website: https://rickaallensf.com/
Genre: First Contact Science Fiction

Review: The Worth of a World, Prequel

Unique races, thoughtful storyline.

As a reader, I always start with the prequel(s) of a series to pull every ounce of depth out of an author’s universe. Rick Allen’s The Worth of a World is a wonderful springboard into the Nodal Community of worlds that provides the arena for the Star Rider series.

The enigmatic entities who create one-way, interstellar bridges between a network of planets in the galaxy are mentioned briefly, but not explored in detail. Instead, the action of the story revolves around a group of delegates, all non-human, from the Trio of Worlds, Emdann, Shren, and Achaylah, who have been sent to Wingt-xem, a planet that has just discovered its link within the Star Rider network. The emissaries’ task is to evaluate the Wingts’ use of advanced technology shared by the Trio of Worlds and determine the merit of the newcomers’ application to join the community. As startling events unfold, the delegates uncover deceit and disturbing truths about the dominant Wingt government and find themselves caught in the crossfire between warring factions.

While it is not absolutely necessary to read The Worth of a World before launching into Book I, I wholeheartedly recommend reading it first as it provides clear understanding of the challenges faced by the Nodal Community in sharing technology among its members. The tragedy that takes place on Wingt-xem is still deeply felt within the drama of Book I.

Review: Star Riders, Book I

The Star Riders are awesome!

The first book of what promises to be an intriguing series is told from the perspective of an astrophysicist of Earth’s first colony who discovers the bizarre Star Rider discs while searching for his missing brother. Bacary and his team are transported to another star system and inexplicably find themselves at the center of a violent conflict within the Nodal Community of worlds linked by the Star Riders.

The writing is clean and flows easily, the mark of natural talent and good editing. The intelligent races depicted are enormously original and refreshing, ranging from the reclusive meerkat-like Emdannens and contentious panther-like Throngans to the white hair-covered of-Shren and humanoid Wingts. The Star Riders are quite mysterious, with the inexplicable ability to generate energy-harvesting discs around stars and manipulate physicality at will. The unseen entities hold themselves apart from those who ride with them to the next star system, dematerializing anything inorganic in the interstellar jumps, thus allowing the “lesser” races to work out for themselves how they will deal with disparities in technological advancement. It is an interesting premise and provides an insightful look at races lacking a high moral code or unified governments who go to violent extremes to further their self-centered goals. Hmm, sounds familiar, doesn’t it?

I really enjoyed Bacary’s journey to find his brother and came to admire the depth of his love and loyalty. I’m looking forward to the upcoming Book II of the series and hope to learn more about the race of Star Riders.

Erin MacMichael is a science fantasy author and artist, creator of the T'nari Renegades series of novellas, novels, covers, and artwork. Her lifelong quest has been to explore past the boundaries of conventional thinking and figure out what really has transpired on this planet. She has traveled extensively throughout the world and lives in the Pacific Northwest with her marvelous offspring.

Erin MacMichael is a science fantasy author and artist, creator of the T'nari Renegades series of novellas, novels, covers, and artwork. Her lifelong quest has been to explore past the boundaries of conventional thinking and figure out what really has transpired on this planet. She has traveled extensively throughout the world and lives in the Pacific Northwest with her marvelous offspring.

 

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